Petey by Ben Mikaelsen

PeteyReading level: 6.1
Lexile: 740
Genre: Realistic fiction
ELL-Friendly: Not particularly
Library recommendation: Middle or high school

Goodreads summary:

In 1922, at the age of two, Petey’s distraught parents commit him to the state’s insane asylum, unaware that their son is actually suffering from severe cerebral palsy. Bound by his wheelchair and struggling to communicate with the people around him, Petey finds a way to remain kind and generous despite the horrific conditions in his new “home.” Through the decades, he befriends several caretakers but is heartbroken when each eventually leaves him. Determined not to be hurt again, he vows to no longer let hope of lifelong friends and family torment him.

That changes after he is moved into a nursing home and meets a young teen named Trevor Ladd; he sees something in the boy and decides to risk friendship one last time. Trevor, new to town and a bit of a loner, is at first weary of the old man in the wheelchair. But after hearing more of his story, Trevor learns that there is much more to Petey than meets the eye.

Petey is an extraordinary story that has the potential to change lives. One teen on goodreads wrote in her review that she used to bully kids with disabilities, but she stopped once she read this book. Even if you’re not a bully yourself, it’ll prompt you to think differently about people with disabilities and the impact that a single person can have on another’s life. In addition, Petey’s character is one that will stick with me for a long time. If I can be as kind and upbeat as him, then I will have lived a great life.

Although the cover looks pretty dull, I was interested in the story from the very start. It isn’t told through Petey’s voice but through a 3rd person narrative that describes what Petey is thinking and feeling. This narration is done expertly and realistically. I can’t think of another story in which a person with disabilities is both the highlight of the story and where the reader could know that character’s thoughts.

My only complaint is that the story is a little too “fluffy,” mostly at the end, to the point that it isn’t necessarily realistic, but it was always very touching (have some tissues on hand).

It is mostly a middle level book (due to grade level. Plus Trevor is in 8th grade) but I could see high schoolers enjoying it as well. It isn’t particularly ELL-friendly because of complex, descriptive vocabulary. However, this book would work well (especially at the upper elementary or middle level) as a class read-aloud if studying tolerance, friendship, disabilities, bullying, hardship…

There isn’t much action in the story, but it is definitely intriguing. I would recommend Petey to two types of students: those who are quick to judge and could be taught a lesson from this story; and those who are patient, careful readers who open their hearts to fabulous characters such as Petey and Trevor

Petey is my twenty-ninth book of the 2014 TBR Pile Reading Challenge hosted by Bookish.

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