The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau

city of emberReading level: 5.1
Lexile: 680
Series: Book of Ember, book 1
Genre: Dystopian
ELL-Friendly: Yes
Library recommendation: Middle school

Goodreads summary:

Many hundreds of years ago, the city of Ember was created by the Builders to contain everything needed for human survival. It worked…but now the storerooms are almost out of food, crops are blighted, corruption is spreading through the city and worst of all—the lights are failing. Soon Ember could be engulfed by darkness….

But when two children, Lina and Doon, discover fragments of an ancient parchment, they begin to wonder if there could be a way out of Ember. Can they decipher the words from long ago and find a new future for everyone? Will the people of Ember listen to them?

Our main characters Lina and Doon live in a less-than-ideal city (their whole world) where there is no sun, and all light comes from electricity. Apparently there is no sky, and the city if self-contained while everything beyond the lighted areas are unknown. We learn little bits and pieces about how Ember is different from where we live today, and my favorite part of the book was the world building because it’s some of the few details the author lets us figure out by ourselves.

The City of Ember is similar to Divergent where the outside is unknown but we know there’s something out there that may or may not be better. The City of Ember is also similar to The Giver where all kids are assigned a job to contribute to the small, artificial society. Ember is less dark (no pun intended) and more juvenile in comparison but it has the same sense of mystery and complexities of how the city functions.

There’s nothing particularly exceptional about Lina and Doon, but as they risk more and more to find a way out of Ember, they make themselves exceptional. What I don’t like about them is that Doon overcomes his dislike of Lina very quickly while Lina gets over the death of a certain family member I will not name (spoilers…) too quickly to be realistic. In essence, the characters have likeable traits but the way they interact with each other and form relationships is nothing memorable or touching.

I can definitely see kids liking this book. It’s a quick, easy, intriguing read, but it is for the younger audiences of upper elementary to lower middle school. The simplicity of the plot and writing caused me to rate it 3 out of 5 stars, and I am left feeling pretty “meh” about the whole experience. The City of Ember ends on a significant cliffhanger, but my lack of enthusiasm about this book and goodreads reviewers’ falling ratings of all following books lead me to not pursue the rest of the series.

This book could be pretty easy to talk up to boys and girls because the premise really is interesting if not executed in an elegant manner (which is okay because it’s written for kids). It’s ELL-friendly, and I would recommend it to young or struggling readers whose reading levels aren’t high enough to tackle other popular dystopian novels (Divergent, for example).

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